Monthly Archives: August 2012

T.G.I.F. ~ Happy Labor Day Weekend 2012!

Can you believe that Labor Day is here already?! It’s crazy how fast time really flies by.      It feels like summer just started a few weeks ago and now we are already talking about fall 2012!

So, what fun Labor Day activities do you have planned for this Labor Day weekend? What’s that? You don’t know what events are going on this weekend? Well, let us help. Below you will find a short list of some of the best events going on in the Greater Philadelphia area this Labor Day weekend:

Longwood Gardens~ Fireworks and Fountains

Saturday, September 3rd, starting at 8:15 pm

             Longwood Gardens is a beautiful year-round destination located nearby in Chester County. Starting at 8:15PM on Saturday September 3rd, Longwood Gardens will feature the spectacular Fireworks and Fountains show. To add to the experience, the show is set to the music of the Summer Pops featuring Leroy Anderson. Anderson’s works include American classics such as Blue Tango, The Syncopated Clock, Promenade, Sleigh Ride and Home Stretch. http://www.longwoodgardens.org/FireworksandFountainsEvent.html

                     Budweiser Made In America Festival Labor Day weekend             festival on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
September 1, 2012 -September 2,2012

 You’ll have a chance to experience all three during the Budweiser Made In America Festival on Labor Day weekend. With nearly 30 acts performing across three stages on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway, the two-day music festival is going to be one of the year’s can’t-miss events.

Tickets for the Made In America Festival are available as two-day passes or single day admission. Click here to purchase tickets

http://www.visitphilly.com/events/philadelphia/budweiser-made-in-america-festival/

  Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire
Saturdays, Sundays and Labor Day Monday
August 4 – October 28, 2012
11AM – 8PM

Anyone looking for an amazing Faire to attend this Labor Day weekend in Lancaster County, should consider heading to the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire! Almost everyone has attended the Renaissance Faire as kids. I remember going in Middle School, eating HUGE turkey legs, getting lost in the corn maze and just having a grand ole time. Why not take your kids to the Pennsylvania Renaissance Faire this Labor Day so that they can share the same memories that we shared as kids. There’s going to be jousting, great food, music, and much more. Spend a day seeing how we used to live in the not so distant past. We promise you will thoroughly enjoy yourselves. Labor Day BOGO Admission at the Faire! http://www.parenfaire.com/faire/main.php

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Make it a Fun and Safe Labor Day weekend everyone! And if you have an upcoming event you’d like us to list in our Friday blog entries, leave us a message and let us know about it. You could see your event in an upcoming edition of the Bradway Blog!

How to make your networking work for you~Part 2

Hello All! Happy guest blogger Thursday!

Please enjoy part 2 of “How to make your networking work for you”, by guest blogger Laura Lorenz.

Let’s talk about during the event.
It is amazing to me, when I go to networking events, which I attend several a week, how many people hang out in herds.
They go and they start talking to the people that they know. You’re there to network. You’re not there to socialize. You can socialize another time. Get out there and talk to people. People go where the food is. If you’re nervous about mingling, hang out by the food and the people will come to you. Maybe make a name tag that makes people stop and look at it and ask questions.
The idea is to be approachable, to smile and be engaging. Most of the people that are there are probably as nervous as you are. Even the people that appear to be self-confident, still have some nerves. It’s human nature. We’re all a little uncomfortable meeting people the first time – after all, your mother always told you not to talk to strangers. But, if you’ve done your work up front, you have the strategy and you know the questions that you want to ask them to draw them out, you can go in with confidence.
Go up to the person that looks like the fish out of water and start with them, make them feel comfortable, help them feel that you really care about helping them. That will ease your fears and help you go on to the next person. Make sure you’re building relationships, not selling. You don’t want to be the person that pushes your business card in everyone’s face and goes, on and on and on about how great they are and their company is.
I know you have run into this person. How did they make you feel? I bet they were the last person that you’d think about working with or referring your best clients to. Don’t treat the evening as a race to see how many people you can tell about your company. It’s not speed dating. It’s seeking to learn about others. The old quote, “We have two ears and one mouth, so that we listen twice as much as we talk” is really true in networking. Listen to the people you talk to and go to the event wanting to sincerely help others. And you will be amazed at what occurs.
Here is another thing you want to make sure you do during the event… When someone gives you a business card, you want to ask permission to send them out your newsletter or outtakes from your blog or some kind of educational piece. If you’re building a relationship with this person, you don’t want to damage the progress that you’ve made by sending them unsolicited email. I have rarely had someone say, “Please don’t send me any information.” But I’ll tell you, I have heard people complain loudly when people email them when they haven’t asked permission.
How many times have you gone to an event and asked for a business card from the person you’re talking to and they replied, “I don’t have one.” Really? You should definitely, always bring at least 100 cards with you. There’s nothing worse than running out. I know this seems counterintuitive from my earlier recommendation about setting a small number of people to talk to.  But think about it this way, when you give out your business card, don’t just give them one. You should give them some for the people that they may know who may need your services. And while I am talking business cards,  another tip is to make notes on the back of the business card while you’re talking to people, so you can remember what you talked about with them.
Finally, if you’ve had an engaging conversation, be sure to leave the person with a next step – for many conversations, asking to connect to them on LinkedIN is a great place to go. If the conversation feels worth a follow up, be sure to talk about calling to set a time for a coffee follow up.
Stay tuned for what to do with the information you received during the event and how to build strong relationship with the people you met.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

“Concise”, “Relevant”, and “Passionate” all accurately describe Laura Lorenz. Ms. Lorenz is a high energy, accomplished speaker and facilitator focused on small business marketing strategies.  With over 20 years’ experience as a marketing and sales coach, Ms. Lorenz intimately understands the necessity of having both the right strategies and the proper tools to grow a small business.  Laura has been in the trenches working as a team member, hand in hand, to develop and implement results-driven strategies with companies nationwide.  Laura believes not only in the importance of teaching the principal knowledge of sales and marketing, but, more importantly, she keenly understands the need to deliver programs which are easy to implement.
Ms. Lorenz teaches three day workshops designed for software publishers, as well as half hour- or hour- long seminars directed to professional organizations, business associations, Chambers of Commerce, BNI groups, and libraries. Everywhere she speaks, Laura brings her enthusiasm, deep knowledge of sales and marketing, and her passion for helping businesses grow. Ms. Lorenz earns rave reviews from attendees for the informative and engaging nature of her presentations as well as the practical applicability of her knowledge-sharing style.
Laura understands the challenges that companies face trying to ensure that sales and marketing become a cohesive unit. By using the Duct Tape Marketing System, marketing processes can be implemented to support the sales team to make sure that prospects move through the Like, Trust, and Try stages before they engage in Buying. Moving prospects consistently through the process makes selling much easier which leads to increased revenue and profitability

Overcoming Competition

“In business, the competition will bite you if you keep running. If you stand still, they will swallow you.” – Victor Kiam

If you don’t have a competitive advantage, don’t compete.” – Jack Welch

The competitor to be feared is one who never bothers about you at all but goes on making his own business better all the time.” – Henry Ford

Most individuals see competition as a plague but I see competition as a welcome challenge. It is what encourages creativity, drives innovation, pushes us to constantly improve our products or services without competition, there is no innovation, leaving the world to essentially become dormant.

Competition is inevitable in business. Even if your business has a cutting edge valuable unique product or service somebody else will come along and try to chase you down and beat you at your own game.

Most entrepreneurs become concerned about competition early on and never quite shake their fears. A recent survey reveals that competition is the 3rd biggest concern of small business owners.

One fail-safe way to avoid a preoccupation with your competition is to place your focus on making your start-up business the best that it can be. Wherever your edge on the competition lies you’ve got to maintain or increase that lead and constantly be looking for other ways to beat your competitors.

If you want to keep your competition at bay consider the following ideas:

1.    Do Some Investigating

  1. Check out the competitions’ businesses thoroughly.
  2. Take the time to observe and go through what your competitors’ customers’ experience.
  3.  Compare their product and/or service mix, pricing, and overall experience rating.

 2.   Develop a “Group”

  1. Create an affiliation of several businesses in your industry that are not a competitor and utilize these relationships to assist one another in the growth and development of each other’s businesses.
  2. Create and maintain a database to hold all of the customers’ information.
  3. Up-sell or Cross-sell

3.  Revitalize your costumer base

Don’t feel defeated or sorry for yourself when competition emerges or starts getting more aggressive than it has been. It’s a “necessary evil” and unavoidable “obstacle” for any business owner. Instead, turn it into an opportunity to re-examine and revitalize your business.

Put the following ideas into practice and your competition will become the drive that makes your business a huge success!

  • Change your competition so that it benefits your success.

  • Don’t imitate your competitors…Advertise Your Selling Point

Often, one of the main reasons why a customer returns to you, instead of one of your competitors, is because of YOUR selling point. Customers will identity your company, products and services by this selling point so make it exceptional. Your selling point will be responsible for virally marketing your product or service as one customer recommends your business to another and that customer tells another and so on and so forth.

  • Add Value to Products and Services

As the well-known author and national presentation specialist, Jeffrey Gitomer, says “People don’t like to be sold, but they love to buy”, and that holds true for both products and services. With your competition offering the same products or services what is going to capture the customer and result in them coming to you is the value you add to your product or service which is offered only by you!! That will build the relationship between you and the customer and that will keep them coming back and it is that that will make them feel as though they are getting “more for their dollar”. And let’s face it…that’s what everyone is looking for.

There are many ways to add value to your product or service, but the one tried and true way which I use to add value to my services, is GOOD CUSTOMER SERVICE. So many business owners seem to forget this as a way to add value. Let’s face it, good customer service is hard to find in today’s world…just visit your local grocery store or department store or convenience store and you’ll experience first-hand what I mean.

  • Promote Innovation in Your Business

Always be looking for new product ideas, marketing strategies, or cost cutting measures for your business as this will refresh your business and set you apart from your competitors.

  •  Discover New Marketing Alternatives

Implement marketing techniques that will attract a different group of customers. In fact, discover a few different techniques and alternate them so that you reach multiple markets, instead of limiting your business to just one.

  • Joint Venture with Competitors

Then there is always the old adage “if you can’t beat ‘em…join ‘em”. And, in business, sometimes combining forces to cross promote and share leads can make for a more viable business for both of you, and even more importantly, for the industry you both promote.

The key, as I see it, is don’t let the competition overcome you, but rather use the competition to make your business a SUCCESS!!

Until tomorrow…Here’s wishing you a wonderful Wednesday!!

 

Super Tuesday~Attracting New Clients

And so we meet again on another Super Tuesday.

Attracting new clients is one of the main constants for growing a successful and thriving business. All of us strive to find the best way to do this and what works for one business may not work for another. So……I ask you this…….

See you tomorrow!!

How to Make your Networking work for you-Part 1

The Bradway Blog is happy to introduce this weeks guest blogger, Laura Lorenz, Marketing Evangelist, Leading Results, who will be sharing her three-part series , over the next three weeks, on “How to Make your Networking work for you”.

Enjoy!

I really believe networking is one of the best ways to grow your business. People talk about social media being all the rage in marketing today and it certainly is a valuable tactic, but I believe that good old-fashioned networking is really still the best way to grow your business. It’s an inexpensive way to build your list and to gain some great strategic partners. You have to go into an event looking to help others,  then all you need will come back to you.

Before you go to the event, however, you need to have a strategy – just like any other marketing tactic. If you go into it without a strategy, a plan of attack, it’s not going to be effective. I am always amazed when I talk to people about networking and they’re complaining that they find networking to be a waste of time. I always ask, “What’s your approach?”

Then I hear this: “I go in and I tell everybody what I do and I hope I get a lead.” Really, this is what they tell me. It doesn’t work, obviously – that’s why they find it a waste of time. You need to have a strategy.

Before you decide to go to an event, talk to the coordinator of the event and find out who’s attending. If they won’t give you names, ask the types of companies that usually attend the event. You want to make sure that the people attending are going to be the ones that can help grow your business, either through who they know or the problems that you can solve for them.

If you can get the names from the coordinator, do your research on LinkedIn. Here’s where the social media comes in. Find out more about what they do, where they went to school, who they know that you want to get an introduction to. It’ll give you a warm way to get into talking to them.

One of the biggest mistakes is that people go into an event, expecting to generate leads for their business. You really need to go into it with an open mind-set of “who’s going to be there” and “who can refer me or help expand my circle of influence”. It’s about building great relationships, not selling to that person at that particular moment.

Think about it. Wouldn’t it be great if you met someone who knows 10 other people that might need your services?

And don’t be afraid if your competitors are going to be there. Go in, talk to them. You actually may find that you provide a service that they’re not providing and you have the possibility of working together. If nothing else, it’s a great time for you to get some competitive information on them.

Once you’ve got a feel for who’s attending, you need to set a goal for yourself. How many people do you really want to talk to? You don’t want to be the one that’s pushing your card in everybody’s face. The goal isn’t really to try to meet everybody that’s there. You want to pick three to five people to have really quality conversations with.

Instead of selling, your strategy should be asking for help. Think about something that you want or something that could make a big difference to your business. For example, you might ask them, do you know someone who… ( and you need to insert who your ideal client is and what they might be saying if they are in need of your services or products). Or your mission could be to ask if the know someone who has a service or a product that maybe you’ve been searching for in your business. You can ask about someone that is just outside your circle of influence that you’d like to meet. There are endless ideas.

Then, ask them how you can help them. Think about who you’re able to connect them with prior to this event and have that in your “back pocket”, whether it’s a company or a potential customer. The idea is to help them with their business and be building that relationship.

Now that you have some ideas of what to give and what to ask for, you want to think about your conversation starter, and you don’t want to begin by talking about yourself. You want to get them talking. Think about the questions you’re going to ask. How did you get started in your industry or who is your ideal customer? How will I know when I’ve met someone that I can refer you to? What do you enjoy most about what you do? What’s the current trend in your industry?

Again, the idea is to get to know them better, get them talking.  Practice your questions so they come out naturally and they’re not rehearsed. After you ask the questions, just step back and listen. You want them to feel like you’re there to help them.

Take some times and watch the movie “Crazy, Stupid Love” with Ryan Gosling and Emma Stone. Ryan Gosling plays a pick‑up artist and while I would not recommend you use his lines, his approach is flawless. He sincerely listens to the women after he asks the questions and then he uses that information to attain his goal. If nothing else, it’s really great to watch a master work at networking and making the information that he learns work for him.

Now they’re asking about you. You don’t want to be the person that goes on and on and on about what you do. The person you’re talking to eye’s are going to glaze over and they’ll be looking for the next person to talk to.

On the flip side, you don’t want to be the person who answers, “I’m a lawyer, I’m a consultant, I’m an architect.” You need to have a talking logo, a way to describe what you do that makes them stop and ask, “How do you do that?” Something that makes you stand out from the crowd. You don’t want to make this up.

Talk to your current clients and find out what they value from you. When you talk about your business want to talk about the value that you provide and who you provide it to. When you’re putting this together, think, “We,” an adjective. Could be “help.” Maybe “teach,” “provide.”

Then next, would come your ideal client. This is not anybody in any kind of business. These are the clients that are profitable, that value what you do and refer you. How will you know who this is? I suggest that you print out a list of your clients and find the ones you love working with, the ones that, if you had 20 or more of them, that you’d love coming to work every day.

They are the ones to call to find out why they like working with you.

Once you done you interviews you will have your “Talking Logo”.  It should be short and sweet. In our case, with Leading Results, our tagline is, “We Help Small Businesses Stop Wasting Money on Marketing.” I’ve had people stop dead in their tracks and say, “But you’re a marketing consultant. How does that work?” That’s what you’re trying to get to.

Here are a few other talking logos to think about:, “We help prevent buyer’s remorse.” This is a software selection firm.  Or  “We bake nostalgia” – from a craft baker who makes Woopie Pies. The idea is that you want to put some effort into this and then practice this.

If it’s a tongue twister or it’s too long, you’re really in trouble. So, practice it. After you get your talking logo down, work on a brief explanation on the remarkably different way you solve your ideal client’s problems. How do you help people stop wasting money on marketing? Or how do you prevent buyers remorse? Again, be brief, because you want to save the really detailed information about your business for the meeting after the event.

This first encounter is where you’re really trying to learn from them.

So, we’ve got our strategy. Our next post, What to do when you get there, will be coming up shortly.

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

“Concise”, “Relevant”, and “Passionate” all accurately describe Laura Lorenz. Ms. Lorenz is a high energy, accomplished speaker and facilitator focused on small business marketing strategies.  With over 20 years’ experience as a marketing and sales coach, Ms. Lorenz intimately understands the necessity of having both the right strategies and the proper tools to grow a small business.  Laura has been in the trenches working as a team member, hand in hand, to develop and implement results-driven strategies with companies nationwide.  Laura believes not only in the importance of teaching the principal knowledge of sales and marketing, but, more importantly, she keenly understands the need to deliver programs which are easy to implement.

Ms. Lorenz teaches three day workshops designed for software publishers, as well as half hour- or hour- long seminars directed to professional organizations, business associations, Chambers of Commerce, BNI groups, and libraries. Everywhere she speaks, Laura brings her enthusiasm, deep knowledge of sales and marketing, and her passion for helping businesses grow. Ms. Lorenz earns rave reviews from attendees for the informative and engaging nature of her presentations as well as the practical applicability of her knowledge-sharing style.

Laura understands the challenges that companies face trying to ensure that sales and marketing become a cohesive unit. By using the Duct Tape Marketing System, marketing processes can be implemented to support the sales team to make sure that prospects move through the Like, Trust, and Try stages before they engage in Buying. Moving prospects consistently through the process makes selling much easier which leads to increased revenue and profitability.

Over the Hump: Help! My Co-Worker’s a Slob!

We’re going to start by assuming that our readers are the most perfect employees/colleagues/managers to ever grace the professional world!  So what if you’re not!  We’re so happy you’re reading, that you’re perfect in our eyes!  If you’re not perfect in real life, read on and feel free to take the advice meant for the “other guy”…we all know him or her…they are the office equivalent of a natural disaster.  Papers everywhere…not a square inch of their desk surface visible and they always seem to use the phrase, “I know it looks messy, but I can tell you right where everything is.”  Yeah, right!

You may have your very own locker, cubicle, corner office or penthouse, but the truth is the workplace is shared space.  Even in kindergarten we learned that failing to share well can lead to unfavorable reviews from your peers. So while everyone has the right to organize (and we use that word loosely) as they please, it still seems reasonable that you should treat your workspace with a little respect for the fact that everyone’s sharing the same environment.

Chron.com offers some tips on how to approach a organizationally challenged colleague:

Step 1

Observe whether or not the employee’s messy habits negatively affect his work performance, his co-workers’ performance or customer service. Some people perform the same in a work area littered with papers, pencils and folders as they do in a work area that’s perfectly organized. Others suffer from a lack of organization. If the employee, his co-workers or customers aren’t affected, avoid addressing the issue.

Step 2

Talk to the employee while he’s at his work area. To avoid embarrassment, address his behavior after the workday ends or when his co-workers are away. While you can call the employee into your office, talking to him about his messy area is best done with visual evidence.

Step 3

Tell the employee that his work area is disorganized and it’s causing his performance to drop. Explain that disorganization makes it difficult to concentrate and that a clean area will improve his effectiveness at work.

Step 4

Point out how the employee can clean up his work area. Tell him to utilize the space he’s been given and to organize folders, papers and other items and drawers.

Step 5

Highlight items the employee must clean up immediately and never leave at his work area. For example, sanitation hazards, such as opened food, can cause ants and other insects to invade the workplace. Never allow those types of items to sit on someone’s desk, even if the employee is productive in messiness.

Step 6

Explain that organizing his work area every day is the key to keeping his space clean and orderly. Tell him to make a habit of putting items back where they belong when he’s done using them.

Hopefully your co-worker can take the hint.  Now, if we can only figure out how to make the office refrigerator less of a hazard…

Monday Funday!

Monday Funday!

Who doesn’t love a snack during the work day?  Some days demand more snacks than others.  But as we strive to stay healthy, even the snacks that seem diet friendly have their competition.  iVillage recently put snacks head to head. Click the snack table below to see if you can spot the healthiest choices for your afternoon nibble.

Over the Hump: Is Your Office a Top Place to Work?

At least once a year…maybe more often….you catch one of those headlines touting the top so many employers of the year.   Fortune Magazine gets a lot of attention when they publish their list, which generously includes 100 of the best places to work.  In 2012, Fortune credited hefty salaries and plenty of perks as the surefire ways to make it onto the list, on the top of which was Google.  In fact, of all the average number of employees of the companies in the Top 10 was12,931.  When asked what made Google so great, one employee was quoted as saying, “”Employees are never more than 150 feet away from a well-stocked pantry.”  That’s one way to win them over.  But what if you’re a small business?  How can you give your employees that top notch feel without building roller coasters in the break room or swapping out cubicles for moon bounces?

For the past three years, the Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia Daily News and Philly.com have been teaming up with WorkplaceDynamics in Exton, PA.  They’ve been doing their own survey of the top places to work in Southeastern Pennsylvania and it offers a little more insight into what ingredients make a top workplace.  What we find especially nifty about this survey is they divide the rankings into large, mid-size and small companies and delve a little deeper into each.  When it came to small businesses, satisfied employees said family atmosphere, flexibility and knowing they’re a name and not a number were reasons for raking their employer high on the list.

The number one small business to work for this year was Cherry Hill Autos Inc.. The company has 64 employees.  One of them said, “I am treated well and with respect from my manager and fellow employees. All employees will drop what they’re doing to help another employee.”

The survey asked for thoughts from other small businesses and here’s a sampling of what some of their employees had to say:

I can work independently; I feel part of the big picture; I actually want to go to work; I’m appreciated. I like what I do.


I am able to balance my work and family life in a way that reduces my daily stress level.


Now that I have been here for a year, I am able to help new hires in the same way that others have helped me.


I am allowed the freedom to do whatever it takes to exceed expectations. I also have a terrific work-life balance that would not be possible at most companies.

It is flexible around my school schedule. I have learned much about litigation, a field I want to work in, and I feel genuinely appreciate as a worker.

None of the comments involved elaborate office decor or expensive perks, but instead, they were grounded in the feeling that they were a respected and valued member of the team. Sure, that kind of environment takes effort, but it may be worth your time investment!
Read more: http://www.philly.com/philly/business/workplaces/20120305_Why_they_love_their_jobs_at_the_small_companies.html#ixzz235SYExhn
Watch sports videos you won’t find anywhere else

Super Tuesday

We all know news is fleeting and this week it’s not surprising that Chick-fil-A has dropped out of the headlines a little more this week. Even when the company was a hot topic you, our readers, seemed pretty neutral on the topic. Last week we asked, “Do you think all of the attention surrounding Chick-fil-A will be positive or negative in the longrun?”  Your responded you don’t think there will be any long term affect.


This week, we want to stay on the topic of publicity, but this time we’re curious about your business:

Monday Funday!

As the end of summer comes into view, we wanted to look back on summer memories, specifically from the days of summer camp.  The book, PS I Hate It Here offers a hilarious compilation of actual letters kids write to their parents while away at summer camp. Here are some of our favorites:

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